books

My Favorite Short Story Ever

And with a title like that, I don’t think it needs an intro. The piece below is from a collection of short stories titled Revenge of the Lawn by Richard Brautigan.

I was Trying to Describe  You to Someone

I was trying to describe you to someone a few days ago. You don’t look like any girl I’ve ever seen before.

I couldn’t say “Well she looks just like Jane Fonda, except that she’s got red hair, and her mouth is different and of course, she’s not a movie star…”

I couldn’t say that because you don’t look like Jane Fonda at all.

I finally ended up describing you as a movie I saw when I was a child in Tacoma Washington. I guess I saw it in 1941 or 42, somewhere in there. I think I was seven, or eight, or six.

It was a movie about rural electrification, a perfect 1930’s New Deal morality kind of movie to show kids. The movie was about farmers living in the country without electricity. They had to use lanterns to see by at night, for sewing and reading, and they didn’t have any appliances like toasters or washing machines, and they couldn’t listen to the radio. They built a dam with big electric generators and they put poles across the countryside and strung wire over fields and pastures.

There was an incredible heroic dimension that came from the simple putting up of poles for the wires to travel along. They looked ancient and modern at the same time.

Then the movie showed electricity like a young Greek god, coming to the farmer to take away forever the dark ways of his life. Suddenly, religiously, with the throwing of a switch, the farmer had electric lights to see by when he milked his cows in the early black winter mornings. The farmer’s family got to listen to the radio and have a toaster and lots of bright lights to sew dresses and read the newspaper by.

It was really a fantastic movie and excited me like listening to the Star Spangled Banner, or seeing photographs of President Roosevelt, or hearing him on the radio “… the President of the United States… “

I wanted electricity to go everywhere in the world. I wanted all the farmers in the world to be able to listen to President Roosevelt on the radio….

And that’s how you look to me.

RB

Advertisements

Bookshelf Styling

IMG_8425

I moved into my place about three months ago, but it’s just now starting to actually feel like home. I’m still constantly moving things around and have knick knacks scattered around but it is starting to feel a bit more put together. In one corner of my bedroom, I have a long standing bookshelf and though it does add more depth to the room with its height, it doesn’t have much space to put things in. Originally, I’d wanted this type of bookshelf:

alaina-kaczmarski-home-tour-jenn-gaudreau-living-bar-2_0Image via TheEveryGirl // Similar bookshelf here

I saw the one I currently have in an estate sale for $8 (?!) and couldn’t pass it up. After cleaning it, it seems to do the job fine and I’m glad I could add more than just books, though I don’t think I’m quite done styling it yet. It’s been an evolving process so far.IMG_8438IMG_8428 IMG_8431IMG_8421

Butterfly Dreams

Image

As if getting out of bed wasn’t difficult enough, these simple little butterflies are sure to keep you in just a bit longer. They add a little something extra to any bedroom (or nursery!) and are sure to make you want to keep dreaming. Getting them on your wall is simple and straightforward, but I’ve still included a step-by-step process.

Image

What your creative self will need:
1. Book (preferably one that you’ve already read and don’t mind parting with. You could also use magazine pages- I just prefer the texture from book pages)
2. Pencil
3. Scissors
4. Glue stick (better to use than liquid to avoid a mess)
5. Hammer
6. Nails

Image

Start by tracing out a stencil for your butterfly. It’s best to use the same one for all others to keep a consistent shape. I drew it freehand, but feel free to print out a butterfly shape.

Once you decide on that one stencil, cut it out and use it to trace all other butterflies.

Image

Image

The number of butterflies you need is really dependent on what space you want them to fill, and how 3D-like you want their wings to appear. I decided on 21 butterflies total, each having around 4 cutouts. That’s a total of 82 (21*4) butterfly cutouts. I realize this seems like a lot, but it’s a more tedious rather than difficult task. Try binging on your favorite Netflix show during the process!

butterflyDIY-1-2

Once you have all your cutouts, glue your butterflies down the center. Remember that you want your butterflies to appear to be flying, so leave the wings intact. Leave to dry for a few minutes.

Image

Fold the layers of butterfly cutouts. As you can probably guess, you want to fold the inner layer the most, gradually folding every layer after that one less, and leaving the outermost layer without a fold.

ImageImage

Place a small nail in the center of each butterfly. Then decide on a layout for your butterflies. I decided I wanted to gradually spread them out (as seen below), so I did place them closer together in the beginning. After you’ve decided on a layout (gently!) nail each butterfly onto the wall. I didn’t need to check for wood first since these don’t need much support. There are alternative methods to stick them on the wall, but this was a hassle-free way (and a butterfly has yet to fly away fall off!).

Image

Image

Ruffle each wing a bit to make butterflies appear less stiff.

Image

If you decide you’d like more variety, add different shapes, sizes, or number of butterfly cutouts. I decided to keep a consistent shape but added one larger and one smaller butterfly.

This has definitely added more character to my room, and at zero cost! I decided to place them right beside my bed, where they definitely enhance my bedroom’s dreamlike vibes.

Image